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Cydelia Reserve

SURVEY OF NATIVE VEGETATION AND POTENTIAL SUITABILITY FOR SIGNIFICANT FAUNA,

FOR PROPOSED SUBDIVISION PARISH OF WARTOOK, CROWN ALLOTMENT 33

(The property now known as Cydelia reserve)

September 2003

Neil R. Marriott, Botanist & Environmental Consultant

1. INTRODUCTION

On September 24th, 25th and 30th I visited the above property with plans of the proposed subdivision, contour maps and aerial photos etc provided by the owner Mr Mark Clyne.

Mark had explained in discussions that he wished to retain as much of the natural bushland as possible - as a result the subdivision would be set around the existing track running roughly west to east through the property. I was contracted to carry out a full flora survey of the property taking particular note of the vegetation communities that occur on the land, the range of plant species and in particular any significant species specifically listed and protected under either state or federal legislation, and where possible the fauna of the property. Assessment was also made of the potential suitability of the property for significant fauna as listed for the district by the Department of Sustainability and Environment (see Table 3.).

2. METHODOLOGY

Following the initial inspection on Wednesday the 24th September, I carried out thorough inspections of all the property particularly the proposed development sites (including proposed access tracks) for each subdivision on the property. Plant communities and their condition/intactness were recorded and mapped as were any significant plant species found during the survey. The precise locations of all significant taxa were accurately recorded by way of a Garmin 76 GPS unit. These locations are provided in the report (Table 2.). Significant plants were also tagged with bright pink fluorescent marking tape, so their locations can be easily observed and avoided during roadmaking etc.

Fauna studies were confined to opportunistic observations, primarily of birds. No systematic studies including trappings of mammals or reptiles were carried out.

Victoria's Native Vegetation Management - A Framework for Action introduced by the State Government in 2002 has adopted the Net Gain principle for all works impacting upon remnant native vegetation. The accounting system for this goal is habitat/hectares -a site based measure of quality and quantity of native vegetation that is assessed in the context of the relevant vegetation type. The Framework requires that all proposed developments be assessed according to this system, and that the development is consistent with the strategy prepared under Section 17 of the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988.

This has been done for every vegetation community or Ecological Vegetation Class (EVC) recorded on the property (Table 1.).

 © Roger Riordan 2004-2017